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20130326
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
blinking stoplight and no movie theaters. so religion was what people did. everyone went to church, and my father was far more conservative than the average person in the town. we were not permitted to wear pants, shorts, no alcohol, no dancing, no musical instruments in our church of christ. in lots of ways i was quiet at home in saudi arabia. [laughter] i devoted my time to trying to figure this country out precisely because i think it is the one arab country that is truly strategic. not only because it is the world's largest exporter of oil, which sustains the western way of life, but because saudi arabia, i am convinced, will be critical in the ultimate resolution of what is the proper islam which is going on now between the radicals, jihadists if you will, and the more modernizing muslims. and that very battle also goes on inside saudi arabia. to try to understand this society, i knew you would like someone coming to to write a book about america, you wouldn't be able to go to washington and new york and claim to understand america. so i had to be confident that i could get outside of
of the jews and religion which was important for the rest of the world. >> sean: is that really so good? >> so for him to say that, it was a good things. and now, he wants the palestinians to recognize the jewish state. this is not going to happen. >> sean: i wanted to get your reaction? >> i spent a good amount of time in israel just over a month ago talking with their ministers and talking with the people. they are guarded. that is the only way i can say. they are guarded about american leadership and they understand our culture. we talk about the red line and who gives netanyahu the go ahead and does it meet the reality. net netted is going to have make the decisions he needs to make and he so get past that. get past the obama statements. get past the fact that we know that in 67 hamas was formed by the muslim brotherhood. he wants us to go back to '67 borders but it's not going to happen. >> the hamas charter still calls for the destruction -- >> look at the culture and look at the fact that they keep their people down so they can use them as ploys, if you will, to the world. the final thi
of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, judaism, christianity. it's a story that's inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. to african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [ applause ] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world.
of life, every background, every religion. and if they've got a good idea and willing to work hard, they can succeed. and that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about not just you know in the syria situation, but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise but also danger in the arab world in north africa. >> julie. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was also hoping you could give us some insight into how you brokered the call today between prime ministers and how much of their willingness to talk is actually driven by the urgency in syria. and, your majesty, you have offered assad asylum which he rejected, does that offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> well, i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremists because extremists thriv
of every walk of life. every background, every religion. if they've got a great idea and they're willing to work hard, they can succeed. that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syrian situation. but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise, but also danger in the arab world. and in north africa. julie pace? >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was hoping could give us insight on how you brokered the call between prime ministers erdogan and netenyahu and how much of their talk is driven by the urgency in syria. and your majesty, you've offered assad asylum, which he rejected. does the offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremism. because extremists thrive in chaos
of florida atlanta university. respects all religions and welcomes people of all faiths, background and beliefs. let us know what you think about this. you can weigh in on twitter. we are ff weekend and start using hash tag ff weekend so we can follow the conversation there this is how we follow it like this. >> alisyn: i understand. that makes perfect sense to me. meanwhile we have this fox news alert for you. because for the first time in four years. the u.s. senate has passed a budget. that's amazing. >> jessie: good job guys. >> the yeas are 50. the nays are 49. >> all nighter. voted on dozens of amendments in ending the passing with a judgment. elizabeth plan is live in washington with more. have you gotten any sleep? when you there watching the vote orama as they everywhere calling it? >> did i get a little bit of sleep it did take all night. with t. was a slow process. it is done. the senate approved the budget first time in four years. 3.7 trillion-dollar blueprint plan. the resolution raises nearly a trillion dollars in new taxes. it does so by closing some tax breaks for t
the world's religions have to that tiny swath of land, and a symbolically rich way for a christian u.s. president to wrap up a trip that has focused on sealing bonds with the jewish state. a trip that the white house and american and israeli officials at this point seem quite pleased with. >> you are in amman, jordan, where the president will be meeting with jordan's king abdullah. he's a very close ally of the u.s. but he is under a tremendous amount of pressure, both internally and externally. so what's on the agenda for the meetings there? >> well, the president lands here in three hours. he's going to have a meeting with king abdullah then speak briefly to the press. only one question on each side and then the two men will have a dinner. as you point out, jordan is a close u.s. ally. the country has a peace treaty with israel. and it's also home to close to 2 million palestinians. so, it would be an important player in any peace negotiations. so that would come up and be up for discussion. but there are other more immediate issues for them right now. syria, jordan has taken in mo
of what makes us a super power because we have people from every walks of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? i was hoping you could give us an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)